Powerful Partnerships. Transforming Our World.
 

BURUNDI

Farming Initiative Fights Poverty and Malnutrition

Our association is very happy with this project because it transformed our lives. With the money from the goat offspring, I was able to send my children to school and ...feed them [an] additional daily meal. I now understand new farming techniques. May God continue blessing the church that has helped us to move out from the dire situation in which we were before.
— Pierre Dieudonné, Sanzwe commune, Muyinga, Burundi
 
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LIVES IMPACTED: 3,633

GRANT AMOUNT $59,012

HOW DID YOU CONTRIBUTE?

For $52 you trained one farmer (who in turn trained another 100 farmers)

For $1,140 you established one of the three field schools.

For $7,000 you purchased the goats given to farmers.

GLOBAL TRUSTEES APPROVED OCT 2015; COMPLETED MARCH 2019.

Help Spread the Word!

Burundi is a small, landlocked country whose people are primarily subsistence farmers. More than a decade of civil war left widespread poverty. Starting in 2000, the Burundi government began trying to revive the economy, but with a booming population and poor agricultural production, it has not made great strides. More than half of Burundi’s children under the age of 5 suffer from malnutrition. 

Farmers’ efforts were negatively impacted by recurring drought, heavy rains, and deteriorating soil. Because the farmers do not let the field lay fallow, the soil is not as fertile as it could be. The farmers needed technical training in modern farming and agriculture techniques. 

The Anglican Church of Burundi, Muyinga Diocese, provided technical training in modern farming, introduced field schools, and created successful farmers’ networks and cooperatives for collective farming and the marketing of products. It also promoted tree planting for commercial and soil retention purposes. The introduction of animal husbandry complemented crop production and boosted household income. 

This project was expected to impact 3,690 people in the Diocese of Muyinga. It actually reached 3,633.

With the new agricultural practices, that included tracing of trenches on the hills and the use of animal manure, the soil fertility has improved—as evidenced by the notable increase in production. 

Read the Full Research Report Here

 
 
 

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