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Doing Homework on the Ground ensures project Success

Why Research is Crucial to the ARDF Model

Marsabit, Kenya and Mkushi, Zambia

 
 Girls at Tumaini Academy in Northern Kenya are hard at work on their lessons.

Girls at Tumaini Academy in Northern Kenya are hard at work on their lessons.

As a child, you probably hated hearing "Do your homework!" But at ARDF, we love hearing this! Homework is a key building block of our unique development model

And we are doing our homework - each and every time we receive a project for review. The work starts long before a project is up for approval. Using our networks in the Global Anglican Church, we build relationships with Bishops and other Anglican leaders who are already providing development assistance to their own communities. People like Bishop Moses in Wau, South Sudan who comments, “I think most of the people who are not believers will really see that the church is meeting not only the spiritual needs – which I came to do – but also the physical need.” These personal relationships pave the way for effective transformation on the ground.

These authentic relationships, based on mutual respect and a love of the Gospel, also make evaluating potential projects easy. Expert researchers travel to the field to ask community members about the viability of the project, the actual needs, and the plans for long term sustainability. We also evaluate the past performance and financial health of our partners. These interviews with stakeholders, potential beneficiaries, and community leaders allow ARDF’s Global Trustees to have informed opinions of each new potential project.

I know the Fiwila project in Mkushi area and I like the work they do for the communities. They have been doing a lot of work in helping communities, especially the farmers. This new project of training farmers is a very good one in that it not only gives them seed funding, but also gives them the much-needed training. Training people in the rural area, especially in farming methods, is lifting them out of poverty. In the past, Zambians used to depend on rainfall to farm, but in areas like Mkushi, which are affected by droughts, it is safer to use other methods of farming. I would therefore highly recommend this project and I believe that it will go a long way in not only lifting people out of poverty, but also tackl[ing] the food insecurity problem.”
– Amos Mbulo, former manager of a commercial bank and large-scale farmer in the Mkushi area
 For every project, an ARDF researcher travels to visit our partners to assess sustainability, monitor progress, and capture testimonies. Here former Communications Director, Charlie Treichler takes notes about a project at the Gambella Anglican Center in Ethiopia.

For every project, an ARDF researcher travels to visit our partners to assess sustainability, monitor progress, and capture testimonies. Here former Communications Director, Charlie Treichler takes notes about a project at the Gambella Anglican Center in Ethiopia.

This is one example, from a recently approved project in Zambia. Although we regularly post project summaries to our blog, there is always more in-depth research available on the project pages on our website. We love sharing this research with you! Email us at admin@ardf.org if you would like to receive specific updates.

When you support ARDF, you are partnering with those on the ground actually implementing the projects. Your role in crucial. We all want to make sure that donor dollars are effective. Focusing on detailed research ensures this. 

 Support ARDF knowing your money goes to well-researched projects!
 

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